Posts Tagged ‘pasta’

Garlic Chicken Farfalle

November 21, 2008


This is one of my family’s favorite meals. My husband requests it at least once a month and always raves and raves about it. But I’ve been bad and have kept it a secret from my blog. Why? It’s white, white, and more white. And that doesn’t make for a pretty picture.

The original recipe calls for a whole stick of butter (!) and a pound of bacon (! again) but I don’t think you need that much of either. I’ve gotten it down to 2 tablespoons of butter and 4 or 5 pieces of bacon (usually turkey but don’t tell my husband!). It also calls for a cup of heavy cream and I use all of that, but I’m sure it could be scaled back.

Garlic Chicken Farfalle

16 oz. Farfalle pasta
1 c. heavy whipping cream
3-4 chicken breasts (boneless, skinless)
2 to 3 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tablespoons pepper
2 tablespoons butter
4 – 5 pieces of bacon, crumbled
1/2 c. shredded Parmesan cheese
1 (12 oz) Lawry’s mesquite marinade with lime juice

Crock pot chicken and bottle of marinade on low for 6 hours. Pull marinated chicken out of the juices, allow to cool a little bit, and shred. Set this aside. About a half-hour before serving, boil the pasta. In a small saucepan, melt butter, add garlic, whipping cream, pepper, parmesan cheese, and crumbled bacon. Whisk together on low heat for 3-4 minutes. In a large bowl, pour over cooked, drained pasta, add chicken and stir through. Sprinkle a little bit more shredded parmesan cheese on top.

Pasta with Pumpkin and Sausage

October 21, 2008


This pasta… omg, I’m so in love with this pasta. I think I could have it once a week for the rest of my life and never get tired of it.

Now for the bad news. It’s a Rachael Ray recipe. Excuse me while I eat every bad word I’ve ever said about her recipes. This has restored my faith in her so much that I’ve actually got another one of her recipes on tomorrow’s meal plan. Crazy or what?

But I will say that the whole “three turns around the pan” thing still makes me want to scream. If you put 1/2 cup, just leave it as that. I don’t mind washing an extra measuring cup. Okay, thanks.

Pasta with Pumpkin and Sausage
from: Food Network

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus 1 tablespoon
1 pound bulk sweet Italian sausage
4 cloves garlic, cracked and chopped
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1 bay leaf, fresh or dried
4 to 6 sprigs sage leaves, cut into chiffonade, about 2 tablespoons
1 cup dry white wine
1 cup chicken stock
1 cup canned pumpkin
1/2 cup  heavy cream
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg, ground or freshly grated
Coarse salt and black pepper
1 pound penne rigate, cooked to al dente
Romano or Parmigiano, for grating

Heat a large, deep nonstick skillet over medium high heat. Add 1 tablespoon of olive oil to the pan and brown the sausage in it. Transfer sausage to paper towel lined plate. Drain fat from skillet and return pan to the stove. Add the remaining tablespoon oil, and then the garlic and onion. Saute 3 to 5 minutes until the onions are tender.

Add bay leaf, sage, and wine to the pan. Reduce wine by half, about 2 minutes. Add stock and pumpkin and stir to combine, stirring sauce until it comes to a bubble. Return sausage to pan, reduce heat, and stir in cream. Season the sauce with the cinnamon and nutmeg, and salt and pepper, to taste. Simmer mixture 5 to 10 minutes to thicken sauce.

Return drained pasta to the pot you cooked it in. Remove the bay leaf from sauce and pour the sausage pumpkin sauce over pasta. Combine sauce and pasta and toss over low heat for 1 minute. Garnish the pasta with lots of shaved cheese and sage leaves.

Crunchy Thai Noodle Salad

June 26, 2008

It’s gotten far too easy for me to fall into a lunch rut. The kid eats pretty much the same thing everyday: a slice of ham or turkey, green beans, peas, carrots, or a combination of the 3, and a piece of fruit. Me? I usually skip lunch because I never know what to eat. So my new goal is to make a couple lunches each week. Actual meals, not PB&J.

Thai salad

My first attempt was this oh-so-pretty Crunchy Thai Noodle Salad. It was colorful and fun and I’m sure most people would really like it. One of the main ingredients of the dressing is sesame oil and I always seem to forget that I hate sesame oil. I love the smell of it, but I hate the taste. Weird, right? I think I’m going to play around with it and see if I can find a good substitution that’s not so over-powering.

That being said, the husband shocked me by eating 2 huge bowls of it. Normally he turns his nose up at anything that doesn’t have a large piece of meat sticking out of it. Even the kid ate a bowl of it.

Crunchy Thai Noodle Salad
from: Vegetarian Classics

For the dressing:

3 tablespoons sesame oil
3 tablespoons canola oil
1/4 cup tamari soy sauce
3 tablespoons lime juice
2 tablespoons tomato paste
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
3 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1/2 teaspoon salt

For the salad:

1 pound spaghetti or linguine
2 cups mung bean sprouts
1 cucumber, peeled, seeded, and cut into matchsticks
1 carrot, peeled and grated
3 scallions, very thinly sliced
2 tablespoons shredded fresh basil
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh mint
2 tablespoons finely chopped cilantro
1/4 cup chopped dry roasted peanuts

Cook noodles until al dente. Drain thoroughly and rinse the noodles under cold running water. Place noodles in a very large serving bowl.

In a medium sized bowl whisk together all the ingredients for the dressing. Pour the dressing on the noodles and toss well. Mix in all remaining ingredients except peanuts. Let the noodles sit for at least 30 minutes before serving. Serve with the chopped peanuts sprinkled on top.

Barefoot Bloggers – Pasta, Pesto, and Peas

June 16, 2008

I joined another blogging group. Sigh. It’s not a baking group though. Everyone rejoice. It’s called Barefoot Bloggers and it’s for anyone who loves Ina Garten. And let me tell you, I adore Ina. I’m a few days late posting (and making) this recipe but I think it’s excusable since I didn’t join until a few days before it was due.

The idea is to puree spinach and pesto and then mix it with a whole lot of mayonnaise, toss it with hot pasta and peas, and top it off with fresh Parmesan and pignolis. I’m kind of a spinach freak so I decided not to puree it. I also cut down on the mayo and only used one type of pasta instead of the two that Ina’s recipe called for.

I am in love with this pasta. I had a huge bowl for breakfast and then shared a bowl with the kid at lunch. I know the husband won’t touch it though. Ironically enough we were watching Everyday Italian yesterday and when Giada put some peas in a pasta, the husband said with complete disgust, “I would be so angry if someone put peas in my pasta!”

Pasta, Pesto, and Peas
from: Food Network

3/4 pound fusilli pasta
3/4 pound bow tie pasta
1/4 cup good olive oil
1 1/2 cups pesto, packaged or see recipe below
1 (10-ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, defrosted and squeezed dry
3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 1/4 cups good mayonnaise
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
1 1/2 cups frozen peas, defrosted
1/3 cup pignolis (pine nuts)
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Cook the fusilli and bow ties separately in a large pot of boiling salted water for 10 to 12 minutes until each pasta is al dente. Drain and toss into a bowl with the olive oil. Cool to room temperature.In the bowl of a food processor fitted with a steel blade, puree the pesto, spinach, and lemon juice. Add the mayonnaise and puree. Add the pesto mixture to the cooled pasta and then add the Parmesan, peas, pignolis, salt, and pepper. Mix well, season to taste, and serve at room temperature.

Pesto:
1/4 cup walnuts
1/4 cup pignolis (pine nuts)
3 tablespoons chopped garlic (9 cloves)
5 cups fresh basil leaves, packed
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 1/2 cups good olive oil
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
Place the walnuts, pignolis, and garlic in the bowl of a food processor fitted with a steel blade. Process for 15 seconds. Add the basil leaves, salt, and pepper. With the processor running, slowly pour the olive oil into the bowl through the feed tube and process until the pesto is thoroughly pureed. Add the Parmesan and puree for a minute. Use right away or store the pesto in the refrigerator or freezer with a thin film of olive oil on top.Notes: Air is the enemy of pesto. For freezing, pack it in containers with a film of oil or plastic wrap directly on top with the air pressed out.

To clean basil, remove the leaves, swirl them in a bowl of water, and then spin them very dry in a salad spinner. Store them in a closed plastic bag with a slightly damp paper towel. As long as the leaves are dry they will stay green for several days.


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